Upcoming Events

Mar30

Paper submissions due for Special Issue on “Nonprofits, Public Policy, and Climate Change” in Nonprofit Policy Forum

March 30th, 2023 - Guest edited by Jennifer A. Kagan, University of Hawaiʻi at...

Oct17

Katherine Chen, The City University of New York (CUNY)

October 17th, 2022 - 10:00 am to 11:30 am PST - Co-Sponsored with the Scandinavian Consortium for Organizational Research (SCANCOR) Professor...

NEWS

The Roundtable Statement — 3 Years Later (September 2022)

Shawn Pope and Patricia Bromley publish commentary discussing whether the Business Roundtable’s “Statement on the Purpose of a Corporation” resulted in increased Corporate Social Responsibility. 

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From Smoke and Mirrors to Walking the Talk: Decoupling in the Contemporary World (August 2022)

Patricia Bromley and Woody Powell’s article, “From Smoke and Mirrors to Walking the Talk: Decoupling in the Contemporary World,” receives the “Decade Award” for the most highly cited paper published in the Academy of Management Annals in the last ten years.

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“Critical race theory” is being weaponised. What’s the fuss about? (July 2022)

Patricia Bromley’s research on history textbooks, mentioned in The Economist, supports arguments that critical race theory is not currently a central part of US history curricula.

Link to Podcast

Link to Article

May 2022

Shawn Pope and Patricia Bromley comment on changes to the World Economic Forum in the latest edition of the LSE Business Review.

Link to Article

April 2022

Climate Change and the Voluntary Sector Virtual Seminar Series: Building Power? The Role of International NGOS in the Transnational Network Against New Coal

Link to Article

March 2022

Doctoral student Minju Choi discusses lab research findings on the negative depictions of Asians/Asian Americans in high school history textbooks in an op-ed in the San Francisco Chronicle. 

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February 2022

Climate Change and The Voluntary Sector Virtual Speaker Series

SPEAKERS

Panikos Georgallis, PhD – Assistant Professor of Strategy, Amsterdam Business School, University of Amsterdam
Daniel Stein, PhD – Director, Giving Green
Emily Thai – Manager, Giving Green

December 2021

The Third Sector & Climate Change: A Literature Review & Agenda for Future Research and Action

This project investigates institutional vulnerability to climate change within the charitable sector.

SPEAKER

Jennifer Dodge, PhD Associate Professor, Undergraduate Program Director Public; Administration & Policy, University at Albany, Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy

November 2021

The Global Civil Society & Sustainable Development lab was awarded the Seed Grant from Stanford’s Center on Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence.

October 2021

Climate Change and The Voluntary Sector Virtual Speaker Series

The Global Civil Society & Sustainable Development lab hosted the Climate Change and The Voluntary Sector Virtual Speaker Series. The project investigates institutional vulnerability to climate change within the charitable sector. 

SPEAKER
Beth Gazley – Professor, Paul H. O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs; Associate Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Affairs Indiana University

Sept 2021

Our op-ed in the Washington Post discusses the importance of including climate change education in civics and history classes.

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Sep 2021

Aaron Tester joins GCCSD as a post-doc. Dr Tester received his PhD in sociology at UC Irvine. His research focuses on environmental, economic, and political changes from a global-comparative perspective. He has ongoing work on deforestation, foreign direct investment, and decentralization across countries. 

Nov 2020

Our research, discussed at Stanford’s Center for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI), shows how Natural Language Processing reveals differences in how Texas history textbooks treat men, women, and people of color.

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Nov 2019

Stanford Report and the Graduate School of Education describe our research revealing that social movements increasingly appear in textbooks worldwide — but more often as part of history and less as a form of contemporary citizenship.

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