PACS Courses


 

 

Fall Quarter 2014

PACS SEMINAR

EDUC 374/POLISCI 334

Research Workshop: Philanthropy and Civil Society, 1-3 Units, Fall-Spring (Woody Powell, Rob Reich, and Paul Brest)

This workshop is intended for graduate students doing research on the nature of civil society or philanthropy and advanced undergraduates doing research or writing senior honors theses on related topics. Professors Woody Powell, Rob Reich, and Paul Brest will lead discussions of recent writings that form the corpus of our scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and civil society. Students will present their work, circulate drafts of chapters and proposals, and receive feedback from instructors, the teaching assistant, and fellow students. The class will be visited on occasion by other scholars and practitioners for a discussion of their work as it related to themes of the class. The course's aim is to help students to produce high quality work that will have an impact in their respective disciplines and shape the scholarly terrain of research on philanthropy and nonprofits.

 

STATE OF THE UNION

POLISCI 57E/HISTORY 57E

Tuesdays, 7-8:30pm, CEMEX Auditorium (Rob Reich, David Kennedy, Jim Steyer)

We live in an age of rising inequality, dazzling technological innovations, economic volatility, geopolitical uncertainty, and the accumulating impact of climate change. These conditions confront our political leaders and us as citizens of a democracy plagued by dysfunction. What are the implications for our nation?

Led by Rob Reich (Political Science, Stanford), David Kennedy (History, Stanford), and James Steyer (CEO, Common Sense Media), this course will bring together distinguished analysts of American politics. Together, we will examine the abundant challenges and opportunities of major themes contributing to the health, or disease, of the United States body politic: inequality, energy and the environment, media and technology, the economy, and the 2014 midterm elections.

Confirmed guests for the class include Mark McKinnon, Steve Schmidt, Gavin Newsom, Reed Hastings, Lisa Jackson, Steven Chu, Angela Glover Blackwell, Laurene Powell Jobs, and Kara Swisher.

 


 

Archive - Previously Offered Courses

 

Spring Quarter 2014

EDUC 374/POLISCI 334

Research Workshop: Philanthropy and Civil Society, 1- 3 Units, Fall-Spring (Woody Powell, Rob Reich, Paul Brest, & Johanna Mair)

This workshop is intended for graduate students doing research on the nature of civil society or philanthropy and advanced undergraduates doing research or writing senior honors theses on related topics. Professors Woody Powell and Paul Brest, with visiting scholar Johanna Mair, will lead discussions of recent writings that form the corpus of our scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and civil society. Students will present their work, circulate drafts of chapters and proposals, and receive feedback from Powell and Mair, the teaching assistant, and fellow students. The class will be visited on occasion by other scholars and practitioners for a discussion of their work as it related to themes of the class. The course's aim is to help students to produce high quality work that will have an impact in their respective disciplines and shape the scholarly terrain of research on philanthropy and nonprofits.

PoliSci 236, 236S; Ethicsoc 232T: Theories of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector  

Seminar 5 units; Spring; enrollment limited to 25 (Bruce Sievers)  

Do you want to participate in awarding $100,000 to deserving nonprofit groups? This course combines the theory and practice of philanthropy, building an understanding of the history and theory of civil society, including its historical development, ethical issues, and modern operation as a driver of social change. At the same time, students will apply these theoretical perspectives to the award of actual grant dollars to organizations they will select.  Engage in a real world challenges of expending private wealth for public good in a democracy.

 

Give Big Or Go Home

Mon/Wed 3:15-5:05 pm; Studio 1, d. school; ME 293; 3-4 Units; Credit/No-Credit

When individuals or organizations attempt to solve social problems by giving money, they often overlook the people at the center of the situation. The bigger the problem, the more removed the donors or funding institutions become from the human experience. You will learn how to use human centered design to shape your giving, while also considering the roles of larger systems. Students will learn design thinking methods, how to conceptualize a system in which you want to make a difference, and creative ways to think about financing change.

For this class, we will be partnering with TheDream.US Scholarship Program and the Omidyar Group.  TheDream.US is a national scholarship fund for undocumented immigrant youth who want to obtain a college education and give back to their communities.  The Omidyar Group is a philanthropic investment firm dedicated to creating opportunity for people to improve their lives.

Thanks to a generous grant from the Learning by Giving Foundation, students will also have $10,000 that they will collectively distribute during the class towards addressing the given design challenge.

Apply
Enrollment limited to 20 graduate and undergraduate students. Application deadline extended to March 31. Fill out the online application and attend the first day of class on March 31. Apply here: http://bit.ly/givebig2014

Teaching Team
Nadia Roumani, d.school & Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society
Lucy Bernholz, Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Questions
nadia@dschool.stanford.edu

 

Giving Tuesdays for #GivingTuesday: Using Design Thinking to Catalyze Activism and Philanthropy

Class meets Tuesday evenings in April 2014; Application deadline: March 31Admission decisions go out by: April 4

Apply design thinking to the domains of activism and philanthropy. Learn about core design principles and explore how these principles are relevant not to the design of a material product but to the activation of a  social movement.

After Black Friday and Cyber Monday, cultural events to mark massive consumerism, #GivingTuesday is a movement to create a day dedicated to giving, not getting. The campaign led to an increase in online giving of around 90%, inspired over 500,000 tweets and generated over 1.2B media impressions. Endorsed by the White House, Bill Gates, Selena Gomez, and Snoopy, #GivingTuesday aims to reclaim the true spirit of the holidays.

Teaching Team:

Henry Timms (92Y + #GivingTuesday)
Jenny Stefanotti (d.school)
Rob Reich (Prof, Dept. of Political Science)
Ernestine Fu (Engineering)
 
 

ETHICSOC 234R: Ethics On the Edge: Business, Non-Profit Organizations, Government, and Individuals (PUBLPOL 134, PUBLPOL 234)

Susan Liautuad, instructor

The objective of the course is to explore the current international emphasis on organizational ethics. Students will consider in-depth complex ethics matters across business, the non-profit sector, and government. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today, including commonalities and links among sectors, through a broad range of international case studies. Examples might include: the Bangladesh garment factory fire and collapse; corruption in Nigeria; the Libor rate-rigging scandal; the US military sex abuse scandal; the GlaxoSmithKline China corruption scandal; racism in international football; drones; social media; and a non-profit sector ethics challenge to be identified. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. Questions of cultural context, how ethics lags behind technology, ethics and leadership, and ethics and global systemic risks (poverty, financial system meltdown, climate change, cyber terrorism¿) will be considered. Attendance required. Grading is based 25% on short assignments, 35% class participation, and 40% final project. The final project is in lieu of exam on a topic of each student¿s choice. Class participation may include a variety of options beyond simply speaking up in class (e.g. participation on the class web site, assisting other students with presentations or final projects, participation in relevant University events, group discussions during office hours.

CSRE 178: Ethics and Politics of Public Service (ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122)

Instructors: Rob Reich

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford. [This class is capped but there are some spaces available with permission of instructor. If the class is full and you would like to be considered for these extra spaces, please email sburbank@stanford.edu with your name, grade level, and a paragraph explaining why you want to take the class.]

 

 

 

Winter Quarter 2014

EDUC 374/POLISCI 334

Research Workshop: Philanthropy and Civil Society, 1- 3 Units, Fall-Spring (Woody Powell, Rob Reich, Paul Brest, & Johanna Mair)

This workshop is intended for graduate students doing research on the nature of civil society or philanthropy and advanced undergraduates doing research or writing senior honors theses on related topics. Professors Woody Powell and Paul Brest, with visiting scholar Johanna Mair, will lead discussions of recent writings that form the corpus of our scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and civil society. Students will present their work, circulate drafts of chapters and proposals, and receive feedback from Powell and Mair, the teaching assistant, and fellow students. The class will be visited on occasion by other scholars and practitioners for a discussion of their work as it related to themes of the class. The course's aim is to help students to produce high quality work that will have an impact in their respective disciplines and shape the scholarly terrain of research on philanthropy and nonprofits.

 

Give Big or Go Home

Weekend Workshop, February 1 & 8, 10:00 am – 3:00 pm; Studio 1 (d. school); 0 Credits

When individuals or organizations attempt to solve social problems by giving money, they often overlook the people at the center of the situation. The bigger the problem, the more removed the donors or funding institutions become from the human experience. You will learn how to use human centered design to shape your giving, while also considering the roles of larger systems. Students will learn design thinking methods, how to conceptualize a system in which you want to make a difference, and creative ways to think about financing change.

Teaching Team
Nadia Roumani, d.school & Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society
Lucy Bernholz, Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society
Matt Rothe, d.school & FEED Collaborative

Apply
Applications close January 23. Apply here: http://bit.ly/popappwinter2014

Questions
nadia@dschool.stanford.edu

 

 

Fall Quarter 2013

 

EDUC 374/POLISCI 334

Research Workshop: Philanthropy and Civil Society, 1- 3 Units, Fall-Spring (Fall: Woody Powell, Paul Brest, Johanna Mair) (Spring: Woody Powell, Rob Reich, Paul Brest, & Johanna Mair)

This workshop is intended for graduate students doing research on the nature of civil society or philanthropy and advanced undergraduates doing research or writing senior honors theses on related topics. Professors Woody Powell and Paul Brest, with visiting scholar Johanna Mair, will lead discussions of recent writings that form the corpus of our scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and civil society. Students will present their work, circulate drafts of chapters and proposals, and receive feedback from Powell and Mair, the teaching assistant, and fellow students. The class will be visited on occasion by other scholars and practitioners for a discussion of their work as it related to themes of the class. The course's aim is to help students to produce high quality work that will have an impact in their respective disciplines and shape the scholarly terrain of research on philanthropy and nonprofits.

 

GSBGEN 381: Strategic Philanthropy

3 Units (Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen)

Appropriate for any student driven to effect positive social change from either the for-profit or nonprofit sector, Strategic Philanthropy ( GSBGEN 381EDUC 377C) will challenge students to expand their own strategic thinking about philanthropic aspiration and action. In recent decades, philanthropy has become an industry in itself - amounting to nearly $300 billion in the year 2011. Additionally, the last decade has seen unprecedented innovation in both philanthropy and social change. This course explores the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations, and corporate foundations; and innovative models, including funding intermediaries, open-source platforms, technology-driven philanthropies, and venture philanthropy partnerships. Course work will include readings and case discussions that encourage students to analyze both domestic and global philanthropic strategies as they relate to foundation mission, grant making, evaluation, financial management, infrastructure, knowledge management, policy change, and board governance. Guest speakers will consist of high profile philanthropists, foundation presidents, social entrepreneurs and Silicon Valley business leaders creating new philanthropic models. The course will culminate in an individual project in which students will complete a business plan for a $10 million private foundation.

 

URBANST 131: Social Innovation and the Social Entrepreneur

Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

Invited lecture series. Perspectives and endeavors of thought leaders and entrepreneurs who address social needs in the U.S. and internationally through private for-profit and nonprofit organizations, nongovernmental organizations, or public institutions.

 

Giving Wisely: Practical Steps to Make the Most of Your Charitable Dollars

Course offered through Stanford Continuing Studies. More information is available here. (Christine Sherry, Visiting Practitioner, Stanford Center on Philanthropy; Philanthropy Consultant)

In an era of shrinking government, nonprofit, and personal budgets, how do you make the wisest use of your philanthropy? How do you know which organizations are really making a difference? With so many organizations and causes in need, how do you find projects and groups that will really leverage your money?

This course is an interactive, practical program designed to help you make sense of where and how to make smart gifts. We will examine how to identify promising organizations, how to compare different organizations in a given field, what questions to ask when considering supporting a group, and how to work with others to maximize your giving. We will look at how small gifts can be structured to have major impact, and along the way we will learn what has worked well and not so well in a variety of giving areas, both domestic and global.

The course has a condensed format that requires full participation, and students must commit to attending all sessions. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Christine Sherry has spent the last decade teaching adults to be effective donors and now heads a philanthropic advising practice. She founded and directed The Philanthropy Workshop West, a program that has educated more than one hundred donors in partnership with the Hewlett, Rockefeller, and TOSA Foundations. She is also a trustee of a family foundation and was the first executive director of the Ploughshares Fund, as well as a vice president and general counsel of SRI. She received a JD from UC Berkeley.


 

Spring Quarter 2013

 

EDUC 374/POLISCI 334.

Research Workshop: Philanthropy and Civil Society, 1- 3 Units, Fall-Spring (Woody Powell, Rob Reich, Johanna Mair & Paul Brest)

This workshop is intended for graduate students doing research on the nature of civil society or philanthropy and advanced undergraduates doing research or writing senior honors theses on related topics. Professor Woody Powell and visiting scholar Johanna Mair will lead discussions of recent writings that form the corpus of our scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and civil society. Students will present their work, circulate drafts of chapters and proposals, and receive feedback from Powell and Mair, the teaching assistant, and fellow students. The class will be visited on occasion by other scholars and practitioners for a discussion of their work as it related to themes of the class. The course's aim is to help students to produce high quality work that will have an impact in their respective disciplines and shape the scholarly terrain of research on philanthropy and nonprofits.

 

PoliSci 236, 236S; Ethicsoc 232T: Theories of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector

WIM eligible; seminar 5 units; Spring; Monday and Wednesday 11:00am-12:30pm; enrollment limited to 25 (Bruce Sievers)

Do you want to participate in awarding $100,000 to deserving nonprofit groups? This course combines the theory and practice of philanthropy, building an understanding of the history and theory of civil society, including its historical development, ethical issues, and modern operation as a driver of social change. At the same time, students will apply these theoretical perspectives to the award of actual grant dollars to organizations they will select.  Engage in a real world challenges of expending private wealth for public good in a democracy.

 

ETHICSOC 183M: Family, Friends, and Groups: The Ethics of Association

Undergraduate and Graduate, 4 Units, Spring 2013, Mondays and Wednesdays 4:15 PM-6:05 PM (Chiara Cordelli)

The practice of associating with others is a fundamental part of human existence. We cultivate friendships, we grow up in families, we work for nonprofit associations or businesses, we join social movements and sport clubs, and we participate in political associations with our fellow citizens. This seminar explores the ethical dimensions of association. What grounds a right to freedom of association? Do we have, beyond a right, also a duty to participate in associational life? Do we have special obligations towards our friends, family members, or fellow-citizens that we do not have toward strangers? To what extent should the internal life of private associations, such as families or churches, be regulated by the state? Should the state support, through tax-exemptions and subsidies, the nonprofit associations of civil society? Can a state exclude non-citizens, such as immigrants, in the same way in which a private club excludes non-members? These questions have wide-ranging implications for contemporary political and legal debates.

 

International Problem-Solving Through NGOs: Policy, Players, Strategies, and Ethics

Undergraduate and Graduate, 2 Units, Spring 2013, Mondays 4:15-6:05pm (Susan Liautaud) 

The course focuses on advanced international problem-solving through the lens of international NGOs but integrating other relevant players addressing global issues. This course will explore the policy, business, strategic, political, and humanitarian/rule of law aspects of NGOs. Students will consider the major issues that international NGOs face in their effort to effect positive change in an increasingly complex global environment. Policy innovation will be part of the discussion. We will draw heavily on a series of sophisticated case studies involving a variety of NGOs, areas of specialization, and geographic regions.  The course will cover a range of topics, likely including: medical humanitarian aid; climate change; the natural resource curse (blood diamonds, minerals, etc.); issues in China; women’s issues; neglected diseases; and poverty.  Prominent NGO leaders from around the US and internationally will join the course as guests. Students will have a final project with great flexibility in form and topic on an issue of their choice (but with content and scope guidelines) but no final exam. Class attendance is mandatory.

 

PUBLPOL 144: Amplifying Your Impact: Philanthropy by Design 

Undergraduate, 4 Units, Spring 2013, Tuesdays 2:15-4:05pm (Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen)

Seminar and practicum. Students drive an actual $10,000 philanthropic process and design their own social change strategy. Topics: strategic planning, nonprofit assessment and site visits, innovative social change models, and leadership development. Speakers include philanthropic leaders and social entrepreneurs. Class activities: group grant assessments and selection, creative problem solving, and decision-making simulations. Individual project: Social Impact Strategic Plan. Must attend first class; limited enrollment. Recommended: PUBPOL 183. Notes: Limited enrollment. By instructor permission only. Attendance at first class session required.     

 

PUBPOL 155: Disruption for Good – Technology, Innovation and Philanthropy

Undergraduate, 2 Units, Spring 2013, Tuesdays 4:15-5:30pm (Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen)

A new breed of technologies and nonprofits are driving unprecedented innovation in how we create, deliver and measure social change. Innovative models and technology’s extraordinary potential to transform billions of individual lives. Topics: social network campaigns, mobile platforms and international development, apps for good, crowdsourcing, crowdfunding, creative swarms, nonprofit evaluators, and new generation corporate philanthropy. Readings: articles, blogs, studies, and websites. Guest speakers include technology, nonprofit and philanthropic leaders. Individual Project: Unusual Suspects project. Must attend first class; limited enrollment.

 

INTNLREL 142: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice

Undergraduate, 5 Units, Spring 2013, Mondays 2:15-5:05pm (Kathleen Kelly Janus)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs’ efforts to promote social change. Limited enrollment.

 

 

Winter Quarter 2013

EDUC 374/POLISCI 334.

Research Workshop: Philanthropy and Civil Society, 1- 3 Units, Fall-Spring (Woody Powell, Rob Reich, & Paul Brest)

This workshop is intended for graduate students doing research on the nature of civil society or philanthropy and advanced undergraduates doing research or writing senior honors theses on related topics. Professors Woody Powell, Rob Reich, and Paul Brest will lead discussions of recent writings that form the corpus of our scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and civil society. Students will present their work, circulate drafts of chapters and proposals, and receive feedback instructors, the teaching assistant, and fellow students. The class will be visited on occasion by other scholars and practitioners for a discussion of their work as it related to themes of the class. The course's aim is to help students to produce high quality work that will have an impact in their respective disciplines and shape the scholarly terrain of research on philanthropy and nonprofits.

 

GSBGEN 512: Funding Social Impact: Methods and Measurement.

2 Units, Winter (Paul Brest)

Traditional philanthropy consists of outright grants to organizations to achieve the grantors' social and environmental objectives. However, the past decade has seen an increasing interest in impact investments--financial investments that seek to generate monetary returns at the same time as they further the investors' social objectives. Throughout the course, we ask: how investors can (1) measure the social impact of the organizations they invest in, and (2) assess whether their own loans or capital contributions actually make a difference in increasing the organizations' impact. We begin by reviewing the domains from which impact investing draws: grantmaking to maximize social impact and financial investing to maximize financial return. We then consider examples of impact investing, ranging from below-market equity investments and loans, to investments intended to create social value while achieving risk-adjusted market returns or better. We consider the role of impact investing at various stages, from R&D to start-ups to growing and mature enterprises. We explore these issues through case studies of impact investing both in the U.S. and developing countries. We examine how investors can identify and assess impact investments, the information, knowledge and skills needed to make impact investments, and the role of fund managers and advisors. We also consider novel impact investing vehicles, such as social impact bonds and B-corporations. Time permitting, we will also touch on the related issue of using negative screens for socially responsible investing.

 

 

Fall Quarter 2012


PUBLPOL 183: Philanthropy and Social Innovation

Undergraduate, 4 Units, Fall 2012, Thursdays 3:15-5:05pm (Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen)

Philanthropic innovation, action and social transformation in the 21st century. Topics: individual giving; philanthropic landscape and models; foundation mission and infrastructure; philanthropic strategy and grantmaking; accountability and knowledge management; global, venture and corporate philanthropy; public policy and advocacy. Readings: business school cases and industry articles. Guest speakers include individual donors and foundation presidents. Class activities: case discussions, role-plays, breakouts, and debates. Individual project: $10 million Foundation Business Plan. Must attend first class; limited enrollment. Notes: Meets GER Disciplinary Breadth: Social Science. Limited enrollment. By instructor permission only. Attendance at first class session required. 


GG381: Strategic Philanthropy.

Graduate, 4 Units, Fall 2012, Fridays 10:00-1:00pm (Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen)

This is one of the first academic courses to present philanthropy from a strategic field-based perspective. Effectively participating in the social sector mandates a firm grounding in the ever-evolving principles, practices, and models unique to philanthropic stewardship, strategy, and grantmaking. This course will provide an overview of the key operational and strategic distinctions between traditional philanthropic entities, such as community foundations, private foundations and corporate foundations and contemporary models, including funding intermediaries and venture philanthropy partnerships. Students will examine the translation of philanthropic vision and capital into social innovation and action by applying strategic decision-making models as frameworks. Students will analyze foundation mission, operating principles, and infrastructure, while learning about financial management, grantmaking, evaluation, and knowledge management. Additional topics include giving, donor intent, policy change, global social investing, venture philanthropy, and corporate philanthropy. Course work will include readings and case discussions, as well as role-plays and in-class debates. The primary individual project will entail creating a business plan for a $10 million foundation. Every business plan will also include an organizational assessment of a locally-based and service providing nonprofit. Each student also will create a short Philanthropic Passion video presentation.


Election 2012

Undergraduate/Graduate, 1 Unit, Fall 2012, Tuesdays 7:00-8:30pm

Co-taught by Rob Reich (Political Science), Pulitzer-Prize winning historian David Kennedy (History) and Jim Steyer, CEO Commonsense Media (and Stanford lecturer).

Follow the course on iTunes U:
http://itunes.apple.com/us/course/election-2012/id565286438

This course will focus on the fall election in November 2012. Class meets once per week, on Tuesday evenings 7:00 - 8:30pm, with serial examinations of major topics at stake in the election: foreign policy, the economy, the Supreme Court, and campaign strategy. We will also devote one session to California.

Distinguished guests will participate in sessions moderated by the instructors, with participation by students. Among the confirmed guests to date:

John Hennessy, President of Stanford University
Steve Schmidt, Campaign Manager for John McCain 2008
Mike McCurry, Press Secretary for President Bill Clinton
John Taylor, Professor of Economics, Stanford University

The course is designed for the entire Stanford community: jointly offered for undergraduate and graduate students (through listings in Political Science and History) and for community members through the Continuing Studies Program. For students, the course is available for 1 credit. Enrollment for the class is capped.  You can begin to enroll in the class on Axess on August 1, 2012.


EDUC 374/POLISCI 334.

Research Workshop: Philanthropy and Civil Society, 1- 3 Units, Fall-Spring (Woody Powell, Rob Reich, Johanna Mair & Paul Brest)

This workshop is intended for graduate students doing research on the nature of civil society or philanthropy and advanced undergraduates doing research or writing senior honors theses on related topics. Professor Woody Powell and visiting scholar Johanna Mair will lead discussions of recent writings that form the corpus of our scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and civil society. Students will present their work, circulate drafts of chapters and proposals, and receive feedback from Powell and Mair, the teaching assistant, and fellow students. The class will be visited on occasion by other scholars and practitioners for a discussion of their work as it related to themes of the class. The course's aim is to help students to produce high quality work that will have an impact in their respective disciplines and shape the scholarly terrain of research on philanthropy and nonprofits.

Workshop Dates: 9/28, 10/5, 10/19, 11/2, 11/9, 11/30

 

 

Spring Quarter 2012

 

POLISCI 236 / ETHICSOC 232T: Theories of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector

5 Units, Spring Quarter M/W 11:00am-12:30pm (Bruce Sievers)

What would YOU do with $100,000? Be involved in real philanthropic decision-making, with actual dollars. Course Description: What is the basis of private action for the public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in a modern democracy? How do nongovernmental organizations operate domestically and globally? The historical development and modern structure of civil society emphasizing philanthropy and the nonprofit sector. Readings in political philosophy, political sociology, and public policy.


INTNLREL 142: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice

5 Units, Spring 2012, Wednesdays, 2:15-5:05pm (Ramdas, Stoner-Weiss)
Co-Instructors:
Kavita Ramdas, Executive Director of the Program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL, and former President and CEO of the Global Fund for Women
Kathryn Stoner-­Weiss, Deputy Director, CDDRL and Senior Fellow, FSI. Download the flyer »


EDUC 374 / POLISCI 334: Research Workshop: Philanthropy and Civil Society

1- 3 Units, Fall-Spring (Woody Powell & Rob Reich)
Workshop Dates: 9/28, 10/5, 10/19, 11/2, 11/9, 11/30

This workshop is intended for graduate students doing research on the nature of civil society or philanthropy and advanced undergraduates doing research or writing senior honors theses on related topics. Professor Woody Powell and visiting scholar Johanna Mair will lead discussions of recent writings that form the corpus of our scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and civil society. Students will present their work, circulate drafts of chapters and proposals, and receive feedback from Powell and Mair, the teaching assistant, and fellow students. The class will be visited on occasion by other scholars and practitioners for a discussion of their work as it related to themes of the class. The course's aim is to help students to produce high quality work that will have an impact in their respective disciplines and shape the scholarly terrain of research on philanthropy and nonprofits.

 


Winter Quarter 2012


EDUC 377/GSB 346. Comparing Institutional Forms: Public, Private, and Nonprofit Forms of Organizing

4 Units, Winter (Woody Powell)

For students interested in the nonprofit sector, those in the joint Business and Education program, and for Public Policy MA students. The focus is on the missions, functions, and capabilites of nonprofit, public, and private organizations, and the managerial challenges inherent in the differnt sectors. Focus is on sectors with significant competition among institutional forms, including health care, social services, the arts, and education. Sources include scholarly articles, cases, and historical materials.


POLISCI 137R. Justice at Home and Abroad: Civil Rights in the 21st Century

Undergraduate, 5 Units, Winter 2013 (Rob Reich)

Justice, the philosopher John Rawls believed, is the first virtue of social institutions. But justice is difficult to define and still more difficult to achieve. In this class, we will consider how three core ideals animate most theories of justice: freedom, equality, and security. The U.S. Constitution spells out the legal framework for the operation of these ideals. Civil rights legislation and litigation are a primary arena in which tensions among the ideals emerge and play out. With 9/11 and the war on terror as our backdrop, this class will examine the idea of justice at home and abroad, focusing on civil liberties as the arena of our concern. This class is especially useful for students thinking about law school, but it is designed for any student interested in the topics.

 

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